Beach Renourishment Updates

Current Status

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) awarded the project to Marinex Construction, Inc. on April 10, 2020. The contractor has provided an initial construction schedule. It is estimated by the USACE that beach construction could begin in July 2020 and continue through mid-November. The construction schedule will continue to be updated throughout the project.

Anticipated Schedule

  • Mobilization: June 15, 2020 – July 1, 2020
  • Beach Fill: July 2, 2020 – October 31, 2020
  • Demobilization: October 31, 2020 – November 15, 2020

Project Overview

Beginning this spring/summer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will be conducting two phases of beach renourishment projects on Anna Maria Island. 

The first phase, the Central Beach Project, will take place along the beaches between 78th Street North on Holmes Beach to approximately 5th Street South in Bradenton Beach. The second phase, the Coquina Beach Project, will take place at 5th Street South in Bradenton Beach and continue south to Longboat Key.

At this time, the Army Corps of Engineers are planning for construction on the beach to begin in July 2020 and continue through mid-November 2020.  Please refer back to this site for regular updates during construction on completion progress, location of active work, and location of anticipated work as the project progresses down the island.

The construction equipment will progress down the beach on a 24-hour, 7-day a week schedule, with heavy activity in front of any single property not expected to last longer than a few days during average conditions. Note that beyond average conditions, this time may be delayed by weather conditions, mechanical repairs, or environmental protection requirements.

As a federal construction contract, the schedule of work and resolution of any complaints is under the strict control of the Army Corps. The County will assist to address questions and comments to the best of our ability and through coordination with the USACE. For additional information, please contact:

David Ruderman
US Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville
Corporate Communication Office
david.j.ruderman@usace.army.mil
(904) 232-1623

In addition to conventional state and federal funding mechanisms for the County’s beach nourishment, the cost of the project will be partly covered by state and federal funding to replace sand loss from Hurricanes Hermine and Irma.

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is this project taking place?

The project extends from 78th Street North in Holmes Beach to the southern end of the island at Longboat Pass.

Equipment staging areas and accesses will be designated at the Manatee Public Beach at the west end of Manatee Avenue and at Coquina Beach Park throughout construction. A portion of the public parking and access will be restricted in these locations throughout construction. Please abide by all safety fencing and do not enter the equipment staging areas and access corridors. We appreciate your understanding and cooperation.

When will the project occur?

The initial schedule provided by the USACE estimates construction to start in July 2020 and continue through mid-November. The schedule on the County’s website will continue to be updated throughout the project.

Will the beach be closed during this project?

Portions of the beach will be closed during active construction that may restrict the public from traversing along the shoreline. Please abide by all safety fencing and do not enter the construction area. The Current Status section at the top of this page will be updated periodically throughout construction.

How much sand will be placed as part of this project? How does this compare to previous projects?

The 2020 construction event combines two projects on Anna Maria Island: the Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project and the Coquina Beach Nourishment Project. The project location is referred to using Florida’s reference monumentation (R-monuments). The Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project is from R-12 to R-36, which is approximately between 78th Street North on Holmes Beach to approximately 5th Street South in Bradenton Beach. The Coquina Beach project is between 5th Street South in Bradenton Beach and continues south to the end of the island at Longboat Pass. This storm repair project will place approximately 815,000 cubic yards cubic of sand at the Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project and 235,000 cubic yards of sand at Coquina Beach.

To date, the County has participated in six beach nourishment projects. Approximately 5.9 million cubic yards of sand from offshore borrow areas have been placed as a result of the County’s and USACE’s beach preservation efforts.

Construction Year Project Placed Volume (CY) Location
1992-93 Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project 2,320,000 Central Beach (R-12 to R-36)
2002 Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project 1,900,000 Central Beach (R-12 to R-36)
2005-06 Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project 213,000 Central Beach (R-12 to R-28)
2011 Coquina Beach Nourishment Project 204,800 Coquina Beach (R-35 to R-41)
2013-14 Anna Maria Island Shore Protection Project 973,800 Central Beach (R-12 to R-36)
2014 Coquina Beach Nourishment Project 251,100 Coquina Beach (R-33 to R-41)

Why is this project important?

In 1992-1993, the first beach nourishment of Anna Maria Island was constructed in order to protect critical upland infrastructure. Since then, approximately 5.9 million cubic yards of sand from offshore borrow areas have been placed as a result of the County’s and USACE’s beach preservation efforts. Beach renourishment projects, such as this one, not only provide recreational beach width for the benefit of residents and visitors, but during storm events, the sand also provides critical protection for structures and infrastructure landward of the beach. In addition, the beach provides critical habitat and nesting areas for protected species such as sea turtles and shorebirds.

This beach nourishment management program is very much like a roadway or other such infrastructure, as in once it is built, it must be maintained. The work you see is maintenance that will help ensure continued presence of a sandy beach and storm protection for the upland.

Where does the sand come from that is placed on the beach?

The sand for large-scale beach nourishment projects such as this come from our permitted, offshore “borrow areas”. The borrow area for this project is located about 2,000 feet offshore of the north end of Anna Maria Island, within the Passage Key ebb shoal.

How does the sand get to the beach?

The sand is dredged from the offshore borrow areas by a hydraulic cutter suction dredge, then pumped through a pipeline to the beach as a water/sand slurry. The submerged pipeline comes ashore onto the beach at a designated landing location, and connects to the shore pipeline, which runs laterally along the dry beach. The sand slurry is discharged from the pipeline and bulldozers work the sand to fill the designed construction template.

Who is the construction contractor?

Marinex Construction, Inc.